Screen Archives Entertainment Screen Archives Entertainment    
   Home  Shipping Rates  Order Info  Contact Us  Links  Change Style
  search tips
   [log in]   [new customer?]  [join mailing list]
 

Site Security
provided by


  
Our Price: $14.95
Bookmark and Share
Label:
Name: TWILIGHT TIME
Number: TWILIGHT186-BR

THE DETECTIVE (1968)(SPECIAL PROMOTION) (BLU-RAY)
Starring:  Frank Sinatra, Lee Remick, Ralph Meeker, Jacqueline Bisset, William Windom, Al Freeman Jr., Tony Musante
Directed By:  Gordon Douglas
Composed By:  Jerry Goldsmith

“The Detective contains a fine performance by Frank Sinatra, and some very good scenes of police work…It provides a clear, unsentimental look at a police investigation, and even the language reflects the way cops (and the rest of us) talk.”
– Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“Strong follow-up to the Sinatra/Douglas private eye caper Tony Rome, with the former now a New York cop fighting crime and corruption in a determinedly sleazy environment. Well acted and directed.” – Time Out London

An “adult” thriller, The Detective (1968) stars Frank Sinatra as the titular protagonist, an incorruptible, no-nonsense cop wrapped up in a disturbing homicide case even as he attempts to deal with the disintegration of his marriage to wife Karen (Lee Remick). Complicating matters is his new relationship with the wife (Jacqueline Bisset) of another murder victim. Jerry Goldsmith wrote the score, available on this Twilight Time release as an isolated track.

LIMITED TO , 3,000 Units

LANGUAGE: English
VIDEO: 1080p High Definition / 2.35:1
AUDIO: English 1.0 DTS-HD MA
SUBTITLES: English SDH
1968 / Color
114 MINUTES
NOT RATED

Special Features: Isolated Score Track / Audio Commentary with Film Historians David Del Valle, Lem Dobbs, and Nick Redman / Original Theatrical Trailers

  
Reviews and Comments: (1)
All times US Eastern   |   login to post your own review or comments.
Posted by Mark Turner on March 22, 2016 9:38 PM
HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED

Released in 1968 I was surprised at how much times have changed while watching this film. The subject of homosexuality was just being touched on and still easing out of the taboo stage with movies like THE BOYS IN THE BAND still 2 years from release. Even more surprising was the fact that Frank Sinatra was involved here giving one of his more subtle performances.

Sinatra stars as Joe Leland, a New York police detective who lands a career changing case. The son of a well-connected millionaire has been murdered and signs of his sexual choices can be found at the crime scene. The same holds true for the list of suspects connected to the case making it not only career changing but a sensitive case as well. Leland and his crew catch the suspect, sweat a confession out of him that sends him to the electric chair and Leland moves up in rank and position.

But something wasn’t right. Leland was aware of this when the whole deal went down. As time passes another case lands on his desk involving the apparent suicide of an upper crust accountant. His wife is certain he didn’t commit suicide but was murdered instead. As Leland looks into the case a connection to the one that made his career is found. If he follows the leads it could result in the demise of his career. If he doesn’t can his conscience hold up to the knowledge he finds?

As a movie the film feels as if it plays things by the numbers in style and acting. Nothing felt as if it stood out while I watched the movie. What did stand out was the handling of the subject matter. The difference in how it was handled compared to today shows how far society has come on the subject. Where scenes involving gay nightclubs featuring little more than guys standing around talking or picking one another up were shocking for their time they pale in comparison to even TV shows today that feature characters in bed together in the middle of various physical acts.

Is it for the better? I don’t know. My own personal belief is that there is far too much made of sex in today’s films and television shows. What was once titillating is now common place making it all seem to mean less while being emphasized more. As I’ve said before there are only so many ways to shoot two people making love in front of a fireplace and I think we’ve exhausted them all.

At the same time it was movies like this that changed the perception of the gay community. It not only removed the shame but the violence brought on those in the community as well. Whether you agree with the lifestyle or not I think we can all settle on the fact that violence towards someone is not the answer. The fact that someone as influential as Sinatra helped to make that point makes this movie historically worth watching.

Twilight Time, a company I have hailed on more than one occasion, has once more brought out a version of a film that holds to the highest quality to be found. The print is clean and as clear as it can be. Extras found on this release include an isolated score track, an audio commentary track featuring film historians Dave Del Valle, Lem Dobbs and Nick Redman and the original theatrical trailers.

 YOUR CART
  Your cart is empty.
TOP WEEKLY CDS
1 THE LOST EMPIRE
2 IN THIS WORLD
3 GRABBERS
4 ROBOT OVERLORDS
5 PROXY
6 COLISEUM
7 [REC] 4
8 ALLIES
9 COSMOS: A SPACETIME ODYSSEY - VOLUME 3
10 FEMME FATALES

TOP WEEKLY DVD/BLU-RAY TITLES
1 GUN FURY 3D / 2D (1953) (SPECIAL PROMOTION)
2 HEAVEN AND EARTH (1993 / REGION A ONLY) (SPECIAL PROMOTION) (GOING OUT OF PRINT)
3 HUSH... HUSH, SWEET CHARLOTTE (1964) (SPECIAL PROMOTION)
4 9 TO 5 (1980) (SPECIAL PROMOTION)
5 DOCTOR DOLITTLE (1967)
6 THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE (1969) (SPECIAL PROMOTION)
7 ALL THE KING'S MEN (1949) (SPECIAL PROMOTION)
8 SAYONARA (1957)
9 THE FORTUNE COOKIE (1966) (SPECIAL PROMOTION)
10 SCORPIO (1973) (SPECIAL PROMOTION)
 
© 2017 Screen Archives Entertainment