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Label:
Name: CHANDOS
Number: CHA10349

THE FILM MUSIC OF WILLIAM ALWYN: VOL. 3 (CD)
Composed by: William Alwyn

Sample Tracks
Name Number
Main Titles 01
March 08
The Hammer Reel 17
Play All Tracks

Premiere recordings arranged by Philip Lane.

BBC Philharmonic conducted by Rumon Gamba.

Released on the 100th anniversary of William Alwyn's birth.

Suite from THE MAGIC BOX 14:50
1. Main Titles 2:05
2. Willie and Helena 3:47
3. Willie's First Customers 0:56
4. Willie Goes to London 3:21
5. Willie and Edith 2:45
6. Death of Willie and Closing Credits 1:57

THE MILLION POUND NOTE 2:56
7. Waltz

THE WAY AHEAD 2:03
8. March

Suite from SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON 8:50
9. Main Titles 3:01
10. At Home 2:29
11. Ostriches and Waterslides 3:20

THE ROCKING HORSE WINNER 3:43
12. Paul's Last Ride

Suite from GEORDIE 17:08
13. Main Titles 2:00
14. Watching the Eagles 2:28
15. The Samson Way 3:12
16. Father and Son 3:14
17. The Hammer Reel 1:43
18. Geordie and Jean 4:32

THE CURE FOR LOVE 3:15
19. Waltz

Suite from PENN OF PENNSYLVANIA 10:56
20. Title Music 1:27
21. Banquet Scene 1:32
22. Love Music 3:04
23. The King's Portrait 2:59
24. Finale 1:54

THE TRUE GLORY 2:37
25. March

Suite from THE RUNNING MAN 10:25
26. Main Titles 1:49
27. Glider Flight 3:19
28. Stella and Stephen 3:16
29. Spanish Gipsy Wedding 2:02

THE MAGIC BOX - The Magic Box was the English film industry's contribution to the 1951 Festival of Britain. Its all-star cast generously forsook their usual salaries for the privilege of paying tribute to that unsung pioneer of cinema, William Friese-Greene, here played by Robert Donat. Adapted by Eric Ambler from the controversial biography by Ray Allister, Magic Box contends that Friese-Greene was the true father of motion pictures, and not such upstarts as W. K. L. Dickson and Thomas Edison. Told in flashback, the film details Friese-Greene's tireless experiments with the "moving image," leading inexorably to a series of failures and disappoints, as others hog the credit for the protagonist's discoveries. The huge cast includes such British film luminaries as Joyce Grenfell, Miles Malleson, Michael Redgrave, Eric Portman, Emlyn Williams, Richard Attenborough, Peter Ustinov, Cecil Parker, Kay Walsh, and, best of all, Laurence Olivier as the confused bobby who witnesses Friese-Greene's first motion picture demonstration. 1951

THE MILLION POUND NOTE - Released in the US as Man With a Million, The Million Pound Note is a satisfying adaptation of a satirical short story by Mark Twain. Gregory Peck plays Henry Adams, an impecunious American living by his wits in London. Henry becomes the object of a wager between millionaire brothers Oliver and Roderick Montpelier (Ronald Squire and Wilfred Hyde-White), who want to find out if a man with a million pound note in his bank account could live comfortably for one month on the strength of that note - without ever spending a penny of it. When Henry is given the note and lets it be known that he has it, every courtesy imaginable is extended to him by hoteliers, restauranteurs, etc. Trouble brews when Henry uses the note's reputation to speculate on the stock market. When his creditors demand that he produce the note as an act of faith, Henry is unable to do so, whereupon pandemonium reigns - and the audience's laughter cascades. 1954

THE WAY AHEAD - The Immortal Battalion has a bit of a convoluted history. It started life as a training film, The New Lot, which ran 44 minutes. When Winston Churchill approached David Niven about creating a film that would do for the British Army what In Which We Serve had done for the Royal Navy, he contacted Carol Reed and suggested expanding The New Lot. The result, written by Eric Ambler and Peter Ustinov, was the acclaimed The Way Ahead. For its U.S. release, Way Ahead was edited to a shorter length and retitled The Immortal Battalion. In either of its feature length forms, the film is concerned with the training of a bunch of raw recruits into a capable and efficient fighting regiment. Niven stars as Jim Perry, a lieutenant and former ordinary guy who finds that he must learn to take a tough line in order to make his wildly diverse crew come together and understand the importance both of the war and of their place in it. Although it takes time and constant effort on the part of Perry and his sergeant, the eight men eventually overcome their different backgrounds and feelings, and transform themselves into a unit which performs its tasks with admirable skill and dexterity, preparing them for their battle against the Desert Fox in Africa. Told in a semi-documentary style, Battalion also features the screen debut of Trevor Howard. 1944

SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON - None of the many cinemadaptations of Johan Wyss' The Swiss Family Robinson are as relentlessly enjoyable as this 1960 Disney feature. The film wastes no time getting down to business, with the shipwreck of the Robinson family occurring as the credits flash across the screen. Fashioning a raft, the family heads to a lush tropical island. While the mother (Dorothy McGuire) isn't too happy about being a castaway, the father (John Mills) and the sons (James MacArthur, Tommy Kirk, Kevin Corcoran) are thrilled at the prospect of carving out a new life for themselves. In short order, the industrious Robinsons have constructed a treehouse with all the creature comforts and "utilities" of their home in Switzerland. Later on, the little party is joined by Janet Munro, the daughter of a sea captain who has been captured by pirate Sessue Hayakawa and his band. After a series of adventures calculated to arouse the envy of every man, woman and child in the audience, the film comes to a rousing conclusion as the Robinsons resourcefully fend off Hayakawa and his pirates with a variety of jerry-built booby traps. A box-office winner to the tune of $30 million, The Swiss Family Robinson proved beyond doubt that Disney's decision to emphasize the humor and adventure of the Wyss original, while downplaying the sociopolitical undertones, was a sound one. 1960

THE ROCKING HORSE WINNER - D. H.Lawrence's tragic fable The Rocking Horse Winner is faithfully transferred to the screen in this 1950 gem. John Howard Davies, the young star of Oliver Twist (and the future chief film editor at the BBC) plays a sensitive lad whose selfish, grasping mother (Valerie Hobson) warps his values. When Mom once more whines over her lack of wealth, the boy retreats to his new Christmas present, a hobby horse. Having been taught to ride like a real jockey by kindly handyman John Mills, Davies furiously bobs up and down on his horse, hoping to drive his mother's words out of his brain. Instead, Davies suddenly acquires the ability to pick the names of winning race horses. Capitalizing on her son's "gift," Davies' mother becomes fabulously wealthy, only to spend the money as quickly as it comes in. Thinking only of his mother's happiness, Davies continues to ride his magical horse, which results in more lucrative racetrack predictions. Before his mother can come to her senses, the boy takes one "ride" too many, dropping dead from the exhaustion. Though essentially a dark fantasy, The Rocking Horse Winner is rendered with utter credibility by writer/director Anthony Pelissier. 1949

WEE GEORDIE - Also known as Geordie, the British comedy Wee Geordie was immensely popular worldwide. A young Scottish boy, slight of frame and puny of muscles, decides to answer a Charles Atlas-style bodybuilding ad. Flashforward several years: the little runt is now strapping, muscle-bound, disgustingly healthy Olympic champ Bill Travers (who actually did "pump up" and slim down to play this role). Evidently his muscles have spread to his head, for Travers sees no need for emotional fulfillment. When he finally does fall in love, it is with towering shot-putter Helga Doris Goddard - the first woman ever able to best him on the athletic field. Director Frank Launder cowrote the screenplay for Wee Geordie with his longtime collaborator Sidney Gilliat; the film is based on a novel by David Walker. 1955

THE CURE FOR LOVE - British actor Robert Donat's one-and-only film directorial effort was Cure for Love. Adapted from a popular stage play by Walter Greenwood, the film stars Donat as Jack, an army sergeant who returns home on leave. Having falling in love, Jack hopes that his hometown girl friend has forgotten his impulsive marriage proposal, but she hasn't. The film's comic complications arise from the fact that Jack, a war hero of conspicuous courage, turns into a quivering mass of jelly whenever dealing with affairs of the heart. The thick Lancashire dialect used by practically everyone in Cure for Love may be a bit difficult to comprehend for American audiences. 1950

PENN OF PENNSYLVANIA - Penn of Pennsylvania was the original British title of the economical biopic The Courageous Mr. Penn. Clifford Evans stars as Quaker leader William Penn, who leaves the comfort of his family estate to fight for the rights of his religious brethren. Penn's crusade for spiritual freedom leads him to the New World and the ultimate founding of the colony of Pennsylvania. The film's highlight is Penn's courtroom trial, an admittedly overlong sequence redeemed by the give-and-take between actors Evans and Joss Ambler (as the judge). Deborah Kerr is merely decorative in the thankless role of Penn's wife Gulielma. Honorable in its intentions, Penn of Pennsylvania is compromised somewhat by its minimal production values, including some of the most unconvincing miniature work ever seen on film. 1941

THE TRUE GLORY - British filmmaker Carol Reed and American playwright Garson Kanin team up to direct the war documentary The True Glory. The movie was assembled from actual footage of the WWII allied invasion of Europe, captured by thousands of different camera operators. Starting with D-Day, the documentary covers the major battles all the way to the fall of Berlin, along with personal vignettes. The prologue is read by General Dwight D. Eisenhower, with Robert Harris and Peter Ustinov providing narration. The True Glory won an Academy award for Best Documentary in 1945.

THE RUNNING MAN - Based upon a novel by Shelley Smith, The Running Man opens at the memorial service for Rex Black (Laurence Harvey), the owner of a small air transport company who is believed to have drowned in a recent glider accident. It soon turns out, however, that Black is very much alive; he faked his death as a means of getting back at the insurance company who denied an earlier claim because he was one day late in making his payment. He has enlisted the cooperation of his wife Stella (Lee Remick) in this scheme. While she waits for the insurance company to approve the claim, he disguises himself, assumes a new identity (that of Charles Erskine, a shoe salesman) and goes to wait for Stella in Spain. Once there, he meets drunken Australian millionaire Jim Jerome in a bar; when Jerome inadvertently leaves his passport at the bar, Rex confiscates it and hatches a new plan to collect on Jerome's insurance as well. In the meantime, Stella has met with insurance representative Stephen Maddox (Alan Bates), who eventually approves her claim. She journeys to Spain, but finds Rex a changed man, and isn't comfortable with either his new personality or his latest scheme. To make matters worse, Maddox shows up. Is it a coincidence or is he suspicious? The rest of the film hinges on the answer to this question, as well as what Maddox's plans are in either case. 1963

  
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